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Full text of "The Tattler"

the 
TATTLER 



119 




40 



WILLIAMSBURG. MASSACHUSETTS 



TIME 



TATTILIEIR 



19 




40 



WIIILILIIAMISIBUIRG,, MASSACHUSETTS 




ilcn teat inn 

(This issue nf the (Tattler foe beuirate to 

itfiss ittaru 9L IHaish 

in qrateful auureriatcm nf her faithful smurrs as 
an inspiring teacher, a sincere ana loyal friend. 



THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief , Ashton Rustemeyer '40 

Assistant Editors. Francis Molloy '40, Franklin Bartlett '40 

Business Manager, Bernard Murphy '40 

Assistant, Bernard Sampson '40 

Alumni Editor, Russell Bisbee '41 

Exchange Editor, Raymond Johndrow '40 

Sports Editors, William Ryan '40, Shirley Rhoades '40 

Literary Editors, Velma Brown '40, Jean Everett '40 

Faculty Adviser, Mary T. Walsh 



CONTENTS 



Dedication 

In Memoriam 

Senior Class 

Address of Welcome 

Class History 

Class Prophecy 

Prophecy on the Prophetess 

Class Will 

Class Grinds 

Class Statistics 

Class Night 

Graduation 

Class of '41 

Class of '42 

Class of '43 

Editorials 

Literary 

Pro Merito 

Tattler Staff 

Forensic Group 

Basketball — Boys' 

Baseball 

Basketball — Girls' 

Alumni Notes 

Soccer 

Class Song 



2 
4 
5 
12 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
27 
28 
29 
30 
32 
31 
34 
33 
35 



iln Inning mrtnnrn, 

of 
Santn 3lnljn Parkin 

(ElaBBof 1942 



HORACE FRANKLIN BARTLETT 
Glee Club 4; Tattler Staff 4; A. A. 3, 4. 
Happygo-lucky 
Faithful to swing 
Bashful at times 



'Beevo' 




VELMA STELINA BROWN 



"Dolly 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 1, 3; Class Treasurer 2; Class 
Secretary 3; Class Vice President 4; Athletic Association 3; 
Junior Prom Committee 3: Class Card Party Committee 3; 
Freshman Reception Committee 4; Spectator Staff 4; Tattler 
Staff 4; Forensic League 3, 4; Vice President, N. F. L. 4; 
Entrant Pre-State N. F. L. Tournament 4; Entrant State N. 
F. L. Tournament 3, 4; N. F. L. Key 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; 
President, Pro Merito 3, 4. 

Very pleasant 

Sensible 

Brilliant 




MARY ELIZABETH TETRO BUFORD 
Girls' Basketball 1, 4; Glee Club 1; Archery 1. 
Merry 

Energetic 
Blithe 



Bette 



MYLA ALICE CAMPBELL 

Basketball 1, 3, 4; Athletic Association 3; Prom Committee 
3; Freshman Reception Committee 4; Spectator Staff 4. 

Merry 

Amiable 
Carefree 





SHIRLEY LOUISE CAMPBELL 

Glee Club 1, 2. 

Serious 

Likeable 

Capable 




LESLIE TOWER COLE "Les" 

Chairman of Forensic Food Sale 3, 4: Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Operetta 3: Athletic Association 3, 4. 
Likes skating 
Troubles no one 
Chatters little 




RL'TFI EVA DODGE 



"Ruthie" 



Pro Mento: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 1, 3: Basketball 
1: Athlete Association 3; Food Sale Committee 2: Winner 
of Essay Contest 4; Class Will. 

Rarely idle 

Enjoys fishing 

Dances well 




JEAN MARGARET EVERETT 

Pro Merito 3, 4: Forensic League 3, 4: Glee Club 3: Class 
Historian 4: President of Forensic League 4; Feature Editor 
of the Spectator; Literary Editor of Tattler 4; Winner of 
Third Prize in National Scholastic Contest; Entrant in State 
and Pre-State Speech Tournaments 3, 4: Athletic Association 
3: Operetta 3; Class History: N. F. L. Key. 

Journalistic tendencies 

Modest 

Easy to please 



MARCIA RITA INGELLIS 



"Mox" 



Athletic Association 3; Operetta 3; Glee Club 3; Commit' 
tee for Class Card Party 3: Committee for Forensic Card 
Party 3. 

Marvelous teeth 

Rarely frowns 

Industrious 



LEOCADIA HELEN JABLONSKI 



'Blondie" 



Operetta 3; Glee Club 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Athletic 
Association 3; Co'Captain Basketball Team 4; Committee for 
Class Card Party 3; Committee for Forensic Club Card Party 
3. 

Likes sports 

Helpful 

Joyful 




RAYMOND FRANCIS JOHNDROW 



"Ray" 



Baseball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3; Soccer 4; Assistant-Editor 
of Spectator 4; Tattler Staff 4: Class Treasurer 3; Executive 
Committee of N. F. L. 3; Athletic Association 3: Glee Club 
3; Junior Prom Committee 3; Freshman Reception Commit- 
tee 4. 

Reliable 

Full of mischief 

lolly 




RITA DORIS LaCOURSE 



'Riu" 



Operetta 3; Glee Club 3: Committee for Class Card Party 
3; Committee for Forensic Card Party 3: Athletic Associa- 
tion 3. 

Reliable 

Diligent 

Likeable 




ANNE LAWRENCE LLOYD 

Vice-President 1; Co'Chairman of Forensic Food Sale 3; Com- 
mittee for Class Card Party 3: Prom Committee 3: Spectator 
Staff 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4: Entrant in Ex- 
temps, State N. F. L. Tournament 4; N. F. L. Key 4. 

Always cheerful 

Likeable 

Loves swing 




FRANCIS PATRICK MOLLOY 



"Frisco" 



Baseball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 4: Soccer 4: Tattler Staff 2, 3, 4: 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 3; Freshman Reception Com- 
mittee 4. 

Full of humor 

Pleasant to all 

Mass of curly hair 




BERNARD FRANCIS MURPHY 



"Murph" 



Baseball 2, 3, 4: Basketball 2. 3. 4: Soccer 4: Captain Base- 
ball 3; Co-captain Basketball 4; Athletic Association 3: Glee 
Club 3: Operetta 3: Senior Dance Committee 4; Junior- 
Senior Prom Committee 3: Freshman Reception Committee 
4: Home Room Council 4: Business Manager Tattler 4: Ath- 
letic Association Committee 3; Senior Card Party Commit- 
tee 4. 

Brilliant ball-player 

Full of wit 
Mi-chievous 




BARBARA ELIZABETH NASH 



Bee" 



Glee Club 3, 4: Committee for Card Party 3: Athletic Asso- 
ciation 3. 

Business-like 

Energetic 

Nonchalant 



FLORENCE WAKEFIELD PACKARD 



"Flossie" 



Class Secretary 1, 2; Pro Merito; Cheerleader 4; Athletic 
Association 3; Spectator Staff 3, 4; Class Grinds. 

Full of fun 

Well-dressed 

Pleasant 





SHIRLEY RHOADES 



'Rhoadsie" 



Assistant Editor of Tattler 3; Prom Committee 3; Operetta 
3; Chairman Class Card Party 3; Chairman Forensic Food 
Sale 3; Chairman Executive Committee, N. F. L. 3; Glee 
Club 3, 4; Athletic Association 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Co- 
captain Basketball 3; Captain Basketball 4; Freshman Recep- 
tion Committee 4; Girls' Sports Editor of Tattler 4; Debating 
4; Forensic League 4; Entrant Pre-State N. F. L. Tourna- 
ment 4; Entrant State N. F. L. Tournament 4; N. F. L. 
Key 4. 

Seldom quiet 

Rates in basketball 




ASHTON HYDE RUSTEMEYER 



"Rusty' 



Class Vice-President 3; Class Treasurer 4; Pro Merito So- 
ciety 3, 4; Secretary -Treasurer of Pro Merito 3, 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Editor-in-Chief of Tattler 4; Class Oration 4. 

Always prepared 

Has ambitions 

Rates praise 




WILLIAM JOHN RYAN 



"Billy" 



Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Co-captain Basketball 
4; Soccer 4; Class President 1, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Association 
President 3; Home Room Council 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4: 
Operetta 3; Prom Committee 3; Freshman Reception Commit- 
tee 4; Tattler Staff 3, 4; Editor-in-Chief Spectator 4. 

Willing worker 

Jolly companion 

Real athlete 





MARIAN EVA SABO 



"M 



anny 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 3: Entrant in Pre-State and 
State Speech Tournaments 3, 4; Pro Merito: Vice-President 
Pro Merito 4; Class Secretary 4; Athletic Association 3: 
Freshman Reception Committee 4: Vice-President Forensic 
Club 4; Spectator Staff 4: Prom Committee 3. 

Merry 

Enthusiastic 

Sensible 






BERNARD KENNETH SAMPSON 
Prom Committee 3: Tattler Staff 4. 
Buzzes busily in his Ford 
Kindly nature 
Seldom alone 



"Sammy" or "Bud" 



WINTHROP ALBERT STONE 

Glee Club 3, 4; Operetta 3: Prom Committee 3. 

Works hard 

Always mischievous 

Seldom serious 



"Bud' 



DORIS MARION WILLIAMS 



"Dotty" 



Pro Merito: Glee Club 2. 3. 4; Operetta 3; Athletic Asso« 
ciation J; Food Sale Committee J; Refreshment Committee 
for Senior Party 4; Class Prophecy on Prophetess. 

Dances well 

Makes friends easily 
Works willingly 



HENRY WOODWORTH WILLSON 



"Snoop" 



Athletic Association 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Forensic League 2, 
•3,4. 

Hurries nowhere 

Wastes time 

Willing to help 




12 



THE TATTLER 



Address of Welcome 



Parents, Teachers, Friends: 

On behalf of the class of 1940, it gives me 
great pleasure to welcome you to our graduation 
activities. The past four years will always be 
treasured memories which have been made pos- 
sible through your untiring efforts. We sincerely 



thank each and everyone of you who has helped 
us in any way to acquire our education. It is a 
great honor to welcome you here tonight, and we 
sincerely hope that you will enjoy our Class 
Night exercises. 

William Ryan 



Class History 



Ladies and Gentlemen: I am here to present 
to you a marvelous new history book — not one 
which begins with the adventures and discov- 
eries of John Cabot, Christopher Columbus, and 
Sir Francis Drake but a striking new modern 
history of the class of 1940 at Williamsburg 
High School. Between the attractive covers lay 
the exciting adventures of twenty-five young men 
and women. 

These adventures began on September 3, 1936 
when sixty-three chattering Freshmen climbed 
the high school stairs for the first time. During 
the first few days we wandered from room to 
room trying to find our places as though we were 
in some great metropolis. During the same 
month some of the so-called dignified seniors 
conducted our first class meeting and we chose 
Bill Ryan, president, Marian Sabo, vice presi- 
dent, Florence Packard, secretary, and Velma 
Brown, treasurer. 

In the early part of October we looked quite 
cute with our head decorations so generously 
donated by the seniors. We wonder whose rag 
bag was ransacked. Those seniors seemed to have 
something against us for some reason or other. 
They even tried to make us bring dolls to school 
but Miss Dunphy came to the rescue of the be- 
wildered "greenies". Anyway we had a lot of 
fun at the reception whether the seniors wanted 
us to or not. 

The rest of the year was rather insignificant, 
but the freshmen weren't. We had many A's, 
but just as many mischief makers. 

In September. 1937, we strolled back and were 
certainly glad to be relieved of the freshman 
burdens. We felt more important to be sopho- 
mores. Many of the original group did not re- 
turn that fall. Everyone was sorry to lose Mi- 
Baker who had gone to Old Lyme to teach, but 
glad to welcome jolly Mr. Melody. He found 



a great many basketball players in our class. 
There were many boys who went out for base- 
ball, too. 

This year Bill Ryan was again elected presi- 
dent, Florence Packard, vice president, Dick 
Watling, treasurer, Velma Brown, secretary, and 
Richard Bates, historian. 

'Twas September, 1938, and we were at last 
among the upper classmen. There were only 
twenty-six of us who survived the exams of the 
first two years. 

Again we chose Bill Ryan as president. Ash- 
ton Rustemeyer was elected vice president, Velma 
Brown, secretary, and Kenneth Torrey, treasurer. 

And again some of our classmen were among 
those heroes who excelled in basketball, and we 
were proud that they were invited to the Bas- 
ketball Tournament at M. S. C. 

The day of the biggest affair of the year ar- 
rived -our dream since we were freshmen — the 
Junior-Senior Prom. The hall was decorated, 
the music, gay, the dancing, fun, the people, mer- 
ry and the refreshments, abundant. There wa- 
ne need to ask if everyone had a good time. 

Then the operetta, "The Sunbonnet Girl". 
was successfully presented by the Glee Clubs un- 
der the direction of Mr. Moran, our music 
supervisor. A great many of US were in the 
chorus and a few played leading part- 
Believe it or not, September. 1939, finally ar- 
rived. Twenty-four dignified seniors chattering 
like squirrels pranced up the stairs at our usual 
pace and took our places in the senior room. 

Our first plan of the year was to make life 
miserable for the freshmen. Wo weren't too suc- 
cessful for they seemed to like initiation. They 
all had a wonderful time at the reception because 
we weren't allowed to initiate the freshmen. 

Our basketball team was honored with an- 
other invitation to play at the M. S. C. tourna- 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



13 



merit. Our cla6s surely can boast some real 
athletic ability in basketball and baseball, too. 

However, the fame of our class lies not alone 
in sports. We have seven extremely intelligent 
Pro Merito students, and there are five elocu' 
tionists who have earned Forensic Keys. This 
is an outstanding record. 

In May, the Juniors sponsored a 'supercolossal' 
prom for us which was much appreciated. We 
are not sure it was all given in our honor, but 
we assume that it was. Anyway it was a great 



success and we had a marvelous time. 

And now that June has come at last, we must 
conclude this book. Tonight and graduation 
night we make two appearances to display our 
wit and intelligence, and our appreciation to our 
teachers. There is no need to mention how 
proud we shall be on graduation night to step 
forward and receive what we have looked for- 
ward to for four long years — our diplomas. 

Jeanne Everett 



Class Prophecy 



While spending a short time in Chicago, in 
the year 1955, I met SHIRLEY RHOADES at 
my favorite eating place. She looked very busi- 
nessdike, dressed in a navy'blue outfit, tailored 
effect. After inquiring what Ed been doing since 
I left school, she told me she was the head 
of a television studio and asked me to come up 
to see it. 

Arriving at her luxurious place of work, she 
suggested that we flash on the screen the faces 
of our classmates. With a flick of her hand she 
showed me ASHTON RUSTEMEYER swing- 
ing a baton in one of the most famous night 
spots of Harlem. It seemed that he had become 
interested in swing after leaving high school and 
had formed a fifteen piece orchestra which he 
called the "Rusty Swingers". We didn't linger 
long with him, but passed on to MYLA CAMP- 
BELL, who was a supervisor in a children's home 
in Wyoming. She was seated in the midst of a 
circle of eager-eyed youngsters all ready for bed, 
who were listening fascinatedly to her version of 
"Little Red Riding Hood." 

Just as Little Red Riding Hood entered and 
said, "What a big mouth you have, Grandma?", 
we saw FLOSSIE PACKARD giving a vocal 
lesson. On the door there was a sign "Mademoi- 
selle Packarde, Vocal Instructor." Of all things, 
whom was she instructing but HENRY WIL- 
SON, who was singing "The Toreador Song" 
from II Trovatore. With what gusto! I didn't 
suppose he had it in him. 

Before we had time to hear the conclusion 
of this gorgeous solo, a familiar face was flashed 
on the screen; it was none other than that of 
BERNARD MURPHY, who was sitting at his 
desk busily writing his daily column "Advice to 
The Lovelorn." I remembered hearing that sev- 
eral years ago he had been disappointed in love. 



Suddenly, a messenger boy came up with a West- 
ern Union Telegram. I couldn't forget that face 
anywhere. It was our friend of all friends, RAY 
JOHNDROW. I was really hard-hit. I wouldn't 
let myself believe that Ray was actually running 
errands for somebody else. But it was so! 

Shirley asked me whom I'd like to see next 
and I told her— DORIS WILLIAMS. Before 
I could wink an eye, I perceived Doris who was 
behind the counter of a small country store in 
Chesterfield. A large sign over the door stated 
that this was the establishment "Dodge, Inc.", 
and from the appearance of things they were 
doing a thriving business. 

From Chesterfield we skipped across the coun- 
try to Los Angeles to the palatial theater, "Ma- 
jestic", where huge signs displayed the lovely 
figure of a girl — none other than ANNE 
LLOYD, who had risen to fame through her 
introduction of the Hodge Podge dance. Flash- 
ing to her dressing-room, we caught a glimpse 
of the same vivacious Anne, surrounded by flow- 
ers and admirers, but as we passed on to the 
next classmate she was shooing them out of the 
room so as to make the first curtain. 

Back again to New England where we found 
VELMA BROWN tending chickens on a large 
poultry farm in New Hampshire — a farmer's 
wife. Can you imagine Velma as a farmer's wife? 

We passed from one unbelievable sight to an- 
other. BILL RYAN we encountered at an art 
museum in New York, attending an exhibition 
of his paintings. He had become a well-known 
surrealist and was widely known as the second 
Dali. 

To far-ofl China we flashed next — to LES- 
LIE COLE, who was doing a fine job of educat- 
ing the heathen. We were very much surprised 
to find WINTHROP STONE, her assistant, no 



14 



THE TATTLER 



longer, plain Winthrop, but Doctor Winthrop 
Stone. 

Back again we dashed across the seas to 'Little 
Old New York". At Carnegie Hall we found 
FRANKLIN BARTLETT conducting his sym- 
phony orchestra in a concert. Much to our sur- 
prise we saw a burly policeman helping to dis- 
perse the crowd outside. Imagine my surprise at 
getting a close-up of the face of FRISCO MOL- 
LOY, an old classmate. 

We left Frisco arguing with a Park Avenue 
socialite as to her rights, and passed on to RITA 
LACOURSE way down in New Orleans. Can 
you picture Rita as a hostess in a grand hotel, 
namely, The Orleana? I couldn't, but there she 
was and doing a good job of it, too. 

The next sight I saw, was a flash of silver 
wings. I wondered what it was, and soon found 
out that it was SHIRLEY CAMPBELL'S air- 
plane. Shirley was now a glamour girl, spend- 
ing her spare moments, cruising around the 
country in her silver monoplane. She was just 
taking off from Rodgers Airport in Honolulu 
heading back east to visit her aunt in New York. 
What a surprise to flash from Honolulu to New 
York to Shirley's aunt's Fifth Avenue home and 
come face to face with BERNARD SAMPSON 
as a butler. He was busily opening the door and 
taking cloaks as Shirley's aunt was having a 
tea. With a turn of a button we were taken to 
the kitchen where we found BARBARA NASH, 
apron around waist, busily making sandwiches 
and frosting cakes, as if she had lived in a 
kitchen all her life. 

Leaving Fifth Avenue we went to the lower 



east side where we spied a tall woman standing 
on a corner dressed in a Salvation Army bonnet 
and cape selling pencils to any passer-by who 
cared to stop. What an uplifting position for 
our old classmate, RUTH DODGE! 

We went from the lower east side to Park 
Avenue where we located another classmate, 
MARCIA INGELLIS, as a fashion designer. 
We looked around her sumptuous apartment and 
gathered that she had been very successful. 

Across the street from Marcia we found a 
dancing school. Signs everywhere proclaimed 
that LOGIA JABLONSKI, Teacher of Polka 
and Rhumba, would give private lessons from 
9 a.m. till 3 p.m., every day but Saturday. 

In a small city in Pennsylvania we ran across 
a neat, well-dressed, middle-aged woman. She 
was standing on the platform in a large auditori- 
um giving a persuasive and intellectual talk to 
a large group of girls. Just as she was empha- 
sizing the fact that others would benefit through 
their aid, Shirley turned a button and we were 
out on the street in front of a large building. 
On the building a sign read, "Y.W.C.A. and 
Good Will Institute", MISS B. TETRO, 
President. 

Most of our class we found in New York, but 
there was one member of it whom we had not 
yet seen. That was JEAN EVERETT, who was 
in London acting as news correspondent for 
the United States. 

After talking to Jean for a short while Shir- 
ley snapped off the television set. I was more 
than glad I had run in to her at the "Elmira" 
for I really enjoyed seeing what my former 
classmates were doing. 



Prophecy of the Prophetess 



Near the end of the year 1956 Ruth Dodge 
and I were in Hawaii. We had just completed 
our third trip around the world on the "Conti- 
nental Clipper." During our years of travel wc 
had visited many of our classmates who had 
accomplished great things in life. We had de- 
cided to settle down in Hawaii for a time to 
write an account of our experiences during our 
world tours. For a week we led a hermit-like 
existence and then became bored with each 
Other. We craved new faces and new voices. 
(That usually happens when two women stay to- 
gether for any length of time.) Since we were 
women of action, we put on our best "bib and 



tucker" called a cab and went to "Waikiki 
Paradise", the most beautiful night club on the 
island. The music was excellent: the food, de- 
licious, and the dancers, exquisite. We were 
feeling that perhaps after all the world wasn't 
such a bad place, when the lights were dimmed. 
Our attention was drawn to a small platform on 
which the spot-light was directed. There stood 
a lovely dark-haired, dark-eyed girl, dressed in 
Hawaiian costume, singing the beautiful songs of 
the island. We saw her start with surprise when 
she saw us hut we couldn't imagine why. We 
listened to her lovely singing and joined the 
hearty applause which brought her back for an 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



15 



encore. This time, however, she surprised every 
one. Instead of singing, she performed a very 
intricate native dance. The applause was deafen- 
ing, but she refused to sing or dance again. She 
came directly to our table and had scarcely 
reached us when she said, "Well, you're a fine 



pair of pals. Why didn't you let me know you 
were here?" 

It was not until that moment that Ruth and I 
recognized Marian Sabo, the Idol of the Islands. 

Doris Williams '40 



Class Will 



Hear Ye! Hear Ye! The class of 1940— that 
inspiring, intelligent, unconquerable class — is 
about to leave its beloved High School. How- 
ever, before we leave this hall of learning we 
wish to bestow upon the faculty and the under- 
classmen some of our most precious possessions — 
treasures which have been dear to us throughout 
our four years here, and which will always be 
cherished in our memories. We also wish to 
leave a few much-needed suggestions. We here- 
by submit to you our last will and testament. 

To the faculty as a whole, we wish to ex- 
press our sincere appreciation for everything 
they've taught us — and also for those things 
which they've tried to teach us. 

To Miss Dunphy, our guiding principal, we 
leave a roll of cotton batting so that at the 
change of classes, she may fill her ears, and keep 
on with her work, undisturbed. 

To Mr. Merritt, we will a pair of shoes with 
iron soles that will make a loud noise when he 
walks down the halls and thus warn the students 
when he's coming to visit classes. 

To Mrs. Warner, who always seems to have 
extra work to do, we leave the suggestion that 
she employ a messenger boy and a private secre- 
tary next year. 

To Miss Curran, we leave four dozen pencils 
equipped with soft lead and good erasers, and 
inscribed with her name. Then perhaps the ones 
she loses or lends will be returned to her and 
she won't have to borrow one so frequently. 

To Miss Walsh, who is leaving us this year, 
we leave our best wishes for a very happy future. 

To Mr. Foster, we bequeath a fingernail file 
so that he can save his little gold jack-knife for 
its own purpose. 

We leave to Mr. Melody an alarm clock which 
will ring every forty minutes during the day and 
remind him to ring the bells to change classes. 

I don't know how she thinks she can spare it, 
but Jeanne Everett wishes to leave twenty pounds 
of her weight to Charles Eddy. 

Ashton Rustemeyer leaves his bashfulness with 



the girls to Lucius Merritt. Do you think you 
need it, Lucius? 

To Rita Kulash, Marcia Ingellis leaves her 
curly hair. 

Leslie Cole's soft voice is willed to Arthur 
Jenkins. 

Shirley Rhoades leaves her athletic ability to 
some member of the senior class of next year. 
You'll have to work hard to fill Shirley's place! 

Anne Lloyd and Myla Campbell leave their 
excellent cake and cookie station on North St. 
to any two worthy members of next year's 
Biology class to be used when they go out hunt- 
ing Bryophytes or Pteridophytes. 

Ray Johndrow wishes to leave his methods of 
teasing the girls to Billy Bisbee. 

Flossie Packard and Bernard Murphy leave 
their sacred corner by the fire escape to June 
Bowker and Ted Ames. They request that it be 
well taken care of. 

To the freshman Junior Business Class, Velma 
Brown leaves her knowledge and studiousness. 

Barbara Nash leaves her seat in the Senior 
room to Richard Culver. 

Shirley Campbell's place in the office is left 
to any girl who thinks she has the ability to 
take temperatures without disturbing a class, as 
well as Shirley. 

Bernard Sampson leaves to Philip McCarthy 
his straight hair. 

Billy Ryan leaves his basketball ability to any- 
one on next year's team who thinks he needs it. 

Rita Lacourse leaves her seat in Spoken Eng- 
lish to any person who will enjoy it more than 
she has. 

Logia Jablonski wishes to give to Josephine 
Cerpovicz her numerous fits of giggles. Logia 
thinks Josephine takes life too seriously. 

Doris Williams's fascination for the name 
"Bill" is left to Thelma Packard. 

Bud Stone leaves his rascality to Donald Wick- 
land. Bud thinks Donald is too bashful. 

Marion Sabo leaves her flirting ability to Con- 
nie Granger and Faith Dresser. 



16 



THE TATTLER 



Francis Malloy's remarkable habit of making 
appropriate undertone remarks in the wrong 
places and at the wrong time is left to anyone 
who can master this accomplishment as well as 
he has. 

Henry Willson, Franklin Bartlett and I each 
sacrifice two inches of our height to Buddy Ro- 
berge, Wilbur Shumway, and Bob Lamagdelaine. 



This completes the last will and testament of 
the class of 1940 given at the auditorium of the 
Williamsburg High School on this 18th day of 
June in the year of our Lord, 1940. 

Witnesses — all disinterested members of the 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior classes. 

Ruth Dodge 



Class Grinds 



Through four years we've worked and played: 
We've had our share of fun. 
And now as we're about to leave 
There's something to be done. 

In order to acquaint you 

With our classmates, one by one, 

I shall try to tell you 

Of deeds that they have done. 

Bill Ryan has been our president 
Each year since we began: 
We know that's an indication 
He'll be a successful man. 

Jeanne Everett, our poet, 
Has always done her work 
To the utmost of her ability: 
She never seems to shirk. 

Shirley Rhoadcs achieved success 
Upon the basketball floor, 
And when she took up debating, 
There, too, she knew the score. 

Ash ton always knows his lesson; 
He seldom makes mistakes. 
We're sure he'll be a great success 
In all he undertakes. 

Ray Johndrow is quite a sport; 
He likes to tease the girls; 
He always finds great pleasure in 
Mussing up their curls. 

Now Barbara Nash is very small: 
We hardly know she's about. 
Except, of course, at tunes when 
She ju-i ha- to giggle out. 

Next we have a shy girl 
With pretty curly hair; 



A girl with Marcia's good nature 
Can't be found everywhere. 

Although she's small she has lots of pep, 
Vim and vitality plus; 

You've probably already guessed that it's Anne 
Without even asking us. 

She has a lovely singing voice; 
She's as jolly as can be. 
Marian's a grand girl to have around; 
Don't you agree with me? 

Franklin — our number one "swing" fan 
Has brought us lots of fun. 
Although he's been here just two years 
He's a friend to everyone. 

Francis Molloy can look innocent, 
Though his grin sometimes gives him away; 
Yet we can be sure that Frisco's around 
Where there's a joke to play. 

Bette recently joined us 

After several years away: 

And now that she's back here with us 

We hope she's going to stay. 

Henry often comes in late; 
He's never in a hurry. 
Rome wasn't built in a day; 
So Henry says, "Why worry?" 

Logia always has a smile 
For each and everyone. 
She seems to enjoy dancing 
And having a lot of fun. 

He has a sense of humor; 
He's an athlete through and through. 
In case you haven't guessed yet, 
That's Bernard Murphy for you. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



17 



Beneath Bernard Sampson's quiet reserve 

A keen wit he does display. 

We feel quite sure that he will be 

A second Jack Benny some day. 

Doris Williams comes from Goshen; 
Of Pro Merito rank is she; 
We wish her success and happiness 
Wherever she will be. 

Velma is a high honor student; 
With great zeal she works and plays; 
She h*as gained a lot of friends in school 
Because of her winning ways. 

Ruth's another Pro Merito; 
She's tall with eyes of brown; 
We hear there's a great attraction 
For her in her home town. 

We have a florist among us; 
He's Winthrop Stone, you know; 
He can call each flower by its name 
And tell how to make it grow. 

She's a tall, good looking blonde 
The boys just can't resist; 



If you aren't acquainted with Myla, 
You don't know what you've missed. 

Leslie lives in Chesterfield, 
But she prefers this town. 
Can it be that Smith School boy 
Who wants her to stay down? 

She has a different boy friend 
For every night in the week; 
And now we girls are wondering 
What's Shirley Campbell's technique. 

She has exquisite taste in dress; 
She's quiet, and she's sweet; 
In the art of making friends with all, 
Rita's hard to beat. 

The fact I'm not a poet 
Is plain as plain can be; 
But still I've reached the end, 
And that's a joy to me. 

I hope I haven't bored you 
With all these little rhymes; 
If you're not too particular 
They may amuse you at times. 



Class Statistics 



Prettiest Girl 
Handsomest Boy 
Most popular girl 
Most popular boy 
Best girl dancer 
Best boy dancer 
Best dressed girl 
Best dressed boy 
Quietest Student 
Smartest Girl 
Smartest Boy 
Best girl athlete 
Best boy athlete 
Best all around girl 
Best all around boy 
Class bluff 
Class poet 
Cutest girl 
Cutest boy 
Most talkative boy 



Myla Campbell 
Francis Molloy 

Florence Packard 
William Ryan 

Florence Packard 

Winthrop Stone 

Rita Lacourse 

William Ryan 

Jean Everett 

Velma Brown 

Ashton Rustemeyer 

Shirley Rhoades 

William Ryan 

Florence Packard 

William Ryan 

Raymond Johndrow 

Jean Everett 

Barbara Nash 

Bernard Murphy 

Raymond Johndrow 



Class wit Bernard Murphy 

Girl with most pleasing personality Velma Brown 
Boy with most pleasing personality William Ryan 
Jolliest girls Marion Sabo and Shirley Rhoades 



Jolliest boy 

Most bashful girl 

Most bashful boy 

Most business'like student 

Model student 

Class orator 

Class giggler 

Favorite gum 

Favorite subject 

Favorite sport 

Oldest boy 

Oldest girl 

Youngest boy 

Youngest girl 

Combined weight of class 

Average weight 



Bernard Murphy 

Marcia Ingellis 

Francis Molloy 

William Ryan 

Ashton Rustemeyer 

Velma Brown 

Shirley Rhoades 

Dentyne 

Typing 

Baseball 

Bernard Sampson 

Doris Williams 

Bernard Murphy 

Anne Lloyd 

2,746 lbs. 

131 lbs. 12 oz. 



18 



THE TATTLER 



CLASS NIGHT 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME 

CLASS HISTORY 

CLASS PROPHECY 

PROPHECY ON THE PROPHETESS 

CLASS WILL 

CLASS GRINDS 



William Ryan 

Jean Everett 

Marian Sabo 

Doris Williams 

Ruth Dodge 

Florence Packard 



GRADUATION NIGHT ORATIONS 
Peace — For Progress Velma Brown 

Forces Making for Peace Ashton Rustemeyer 

CLASS MOTTO— Smile at Difficulties 
CLASS GIFT — American Flag and Standard 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

William Ryan 
Velma Brown- 
Marian Sabo 
Ashton Rustemeyer 



SENIOR CLASS 



Franklin Bartlett 
**Velma Brown 
Myla Campbell 
Shirley Campbell 
Leslie Cole 
•Ruth Dodge 
*Jean Everett 
Marcia Ingellis 
Logia Jablonski 
Raymond Johndrow 
Rita Lacourse 
Anne Lloyd 



Francis Molloy 

Bernard Murphy 

Barbara Nash 

♦Florence Packard 

Shirley Rhoades 

**Ashton Rustemeyer 

William Ryan 

*Marian Sabo 

Bernard Sampson 

Winthrop Stone 

*Doris Williams 

Henry Willson 



Mary Elizabeth Buiord 



*Pro Merito 



**H.gh Honor 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



19 




Class of 1941 



First row — Esther Mollison, Josephine Cerpovicz, Robert Newell, Lucius Merritt, Faith Dresser, 
Russell Bisbee, Hope Jarvis, June Bowker. 

Second row — Henry Kopka, Frederick Allen, Phyllis Sutherland, Lida Miner, Mary Daniels, 
Constance Granger, Rita Kulash, Edward Ames, Richard Culver. 

Third row — Robert Kearney, Jeanette Wright, Wellington Graves, Robert McAllister, Adelbert 
Roberge, Frederick King. 

Last row — Jerry Larkin, Leo Dymerski. 

Absent — Harold Hillenbrand. 



JUNIORS 

Here we have the Juniors, 
The class of Ml. 
They don't believe in playing 
Until their work is done. 

A happy class they seem to be 
And studious, indeed! 
If they continue their good work 
We're sure they will succeed. 



20 



THE TATTLER 










Class of 1942 



First row — Thelma Packard, Wilbur Shumvvay, Cecelia Soltys, Lucius Jenkins, Doris Dymerski, 
Jean Warner, Harry Warner, Dorothy Carney, Doris Sincage, Robert Lamagdelaine, Mar- 
garet Stone, Robert Edwards, Audrey Jones. Ralph Bates. 

Second row — Nancy Buck, Lena Guyette, Catherine Polwrek, Amelia Kolosewicz. Michael Batura, 
Donald Campbell, Eloise Bartlett, Charles Bartlett, Dorothy Stimson, Sylvia Clary, John 
Barrus, Mary Kellogg, Grace Tobin. 

Last row — Dorothy Fisher, Josephine Ozierynski, Edward Golash, Mavis Wickland, Elizabeth 
Allaire, Charles Eddy, Leo Stone, Lois Baker. 

Absent — Victoria Michaloski, Burt Sanderson, David West 



SOPHOMORES 

Here's the class of '4" 1 
Quite a large one, it is true, 
And when it comes to having tests 
The A's are rather few. 

They're really very peppy. 
Quite often up to tricks. 
Never in their seats on time 
And always in a fix. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



21 




Class of 1943 



First row — Marion Allaire, Betty Damon, Constance Penn, Lester Shaw, Francis Dresser, Geneva 
Graves, Arlene Sabo, Mary Bowker, Mildred Shaw, George Molloy, William Bisbee, June 
Colburn, Frostine Graves, Shirley Knight, Roger King, Joseph Haigh. 

Second row — Ruth Talbot, Carolyn Emerson, Warren Bnsbois, Sophie Guzik, Robert Munson, 
Marguerite Pomeroy, Ruth Sanderson, Jean Crone, Norma Wells, Marian Culver, Frank 
Munson, Carol Wilson, Eleanor Rhoades, Isabel Murphy. 

Third row — Philip McCarthy, Donald Wickland, Bernice Golash, Mary Noyes, Francis O'Brien. 

Last row — Arthur Jenkins, Charles Read, Howard O'Brien, Irene Metz, Millard Hathaway. 

Absent — Francis Demerski, Donald Howe, Karl Hillenbrand, Walter Kopka, Amelia Kulas, 
Theresa Kulas, Lorena Nietsche, Marian Weeks. 



FRESHMEN 

Meet the Class of '43 
They've been with us a year; 
They're clever, smart, and witty, 
And noisy, too, we fear. 

Talking is their hobby, 
Writing notes — their game, 
Wasting time — a habit, 
Success, we hope, their aim. 



22 



THE TATTLER 



Editorials 



HIGH SCHOOL 

What is the purpose of high school? Of 
course the main reason that we attend high 
school for four years is to learn something. 
When wc leave, our minds should be greatly en- 
riched, and if they are not it has failed in its 
chief purpose. There are several minor purposes 
which are also of great importance. When we 
enter, we meet people we have never known be- 
fore, and we make new friendships which are 
invaluable. Also high school serves to stimulate 
the mind and make us think and reason things 
out through its courses in algebra, science and 
mathematics, to mention a few. High school is 
also a preparation for greater things to come. 
Whether we are preparing to go out to look for 
a job or to go to college, we should have as a 
foundation a high school education. The kind of 
work a person will do in later life may be judged 
according to the work he does in high school. It 
is up to us as students to help the school to 
achieve these aims by our cooperation. Unfor- 
tunately, some people cannot see this and they 
waste their time in school and don't do any 
homework. Too late they realize what high 
school could have done for them had they only 
been willing to cooperate. So, in the future let 
us be more cooperative and let high school ac- 
complish its purpose. 

Ashton Rustemeyer, '40 

SWING 

Many critics have denounced Swing as being 
detrimental to the minds of young Americans. 
But actually this is not so, for Swing is no more 
harmful than the most renowned symphony or 
opera. It occupies much of the young peoples 
time, which might be spent in activities that 
would be harmful to them. 

These critics also reject the practice of swing- 
ing the classics, in fact the whole of Swing music. 
They give as their reason that there is no music 
to Swing. There is really no basis for these state- 
ments, only prejudices. The only possible reason 
for these absurd statements is that not all swing 
music is written, for some is improvised. This 
really gives the musicians a chance to create and 
present their own musical ideas. Even if these 
musicians never read a note, they would still be 
producing music. 

A group of these critics recently wrote to the 



Federal Communications Commission proposing a 
censorship of all music broadcast, and excluding 
the classics that were swung. This was, of course, 
out of the question, for it was in direct contrast 
to our democratic ideals. They stated that it 
distressed people who were against swinging the 
classics. There is no law compelling these people 
to listen to this music which distresses them. 
Who has a better right to turn it off? As long 
as our government remains a true democracy, 
we the people will have the right to choose the 
kind of music we listen to. 

The idea of denouncing the products of oppos- 
ing businessmen is unethical from the stand- 
point of good salesmanship in any business. 
There is no reason why music should offer an 
exception. 

Swing music has been with us in one form 
or another since the early days of the negro 
spiritual. And in spite of these critics, it will 
continue to be an American form of musical ex- 
pression. It may change its name, but it will 
still have that 'swing'. 

Franklin Bartlett, '40 

AMERICAN YOUTH OF TODAY 

The American youths of today in the United 
States Army are better fit physically, have a bet- 
ter education, and are more intelligent than the 
roldiers of any other regular army in the world. 
This is so because the requirements tor entrance 
into the United States Army are higher than 
those in any other country in the world. 

That is one side of the picture. There is, 
however, another side which isn't such a pleas- 
ant one. This concerns the large number of re- 
jections of applications tor enlistment in the 
army. In southern New York, 3 2 per cent of 
the applications have been rejected because of 
the physical unfitness of the applicants. 

That something ought to be done to remedy 
this situation is evident. There are many ways 
to improve the physical condition of the young 
people of America. One way to do this is to 
have at least one period a day for physical in* 
■traction in every grammar school, high school, 
and college in the United States. It is true 
that many schools already have a period for 
physical instruction every day or twice a week. 
There are, however, many other schools in which 
(Continued on Page 3 5) 






WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



Literary 



THE ZERO HOUR 

The air was heavy with mist. Little streams 
of water trickled down the sides of the muddy 
trenches and emptied into the ever-deepening 
muck lining their bottoms. All was still except 
for the constant dripping of the water. In the 
dingy trenches the men were waiting quietly. 
Whispered from man to man came the order for 
an attack at two'thirty. Craig looked at his 
watch. By the glimmer from a smoky oil lamp he 
could see that it was twentynine minutes past 
two already. The air pressed heavily against his 
face. His blood throbbed. Visions passed before 
his mind. He saw his home, his mother looking 
at the list of the dead, knowing that any minute 
she might read the name of her son. He saw 
his brother somewhere out in the black — waiting. 
When were they going? Hadn't the minute 
passed? It seemed like hours. He leaned against 
the slimy duckboard. His head pounded and his 
limbs ached. Wait! What was that? Somewhere 
down the trench a whistle had sounded. Near 
him another whistle took up the order and 
screamed it on. Instantly the scene changed. It 
was no longer quiet. The air was filled with 
screaming shells, and the boom of the artillery 
lent a background to the clamor. The released 
men swarmed from the trenches and charged 
across the field into the spattering fire of the 
enemy. 

As they charged on, the enemy fire took its 
toll. Craig saw comrades fall on left and right, 
but he kept on. The concussion from an explod- 
ing shell threw him to the ground. As he tried 
to get up, the feet of smoke-blinded men tram- 
pled him down again. They passed over, and 
though Craig was badly dazed, he recovered the 
use of his feet and went on stumbling after them. 
They had covered most of the field now. Right 
before them were the blazing trenches of the 
enemy, and stretching away behind them lay the 
reddened fields, the dead and the wounded. The 
scene was more horrible now. Fighting at close 
range was always more horrible, Craig thought. 
Hand grenades tossed into the oncoming ranks 
blew their victims to pieces. Trench mortars 
hurled their charges which landed with such 
incredible force that they tore huge holes in the 
earth, sometimes swallowing an entire regiment. 
Men gaped at the bloody holes where arms and 



legs had been; and some poor creatures went on 
living in dreadful agony long after they should 
have died. It was this horror that drove Craig 
on — on towards another slimy trench — on to 
the murderers of his comrades. He was very 
near now. As he stooped to untangle some death 
clinging barbed wire from about his ankles, the 
deadly rake of a machine gun sent him to the 
ground. The smoke cleared away and all was 
still again for Craig. War had claimed one more 
victim. 

Francis Dresser, '43 

DREAMING 

Life's before you; run and grasp it. 
Do not let your hopes be dulled. 
Life's illusive; Life is tricky, 
And you who dream will soon be lulled 
Into deep and peaceful slumber, 
Whence the lulled one wakes to sorrow, 
Trapped too well in life's own pitfall — 
"There's no rush, there's still to-morrow." 

Dreamers? Yes! But dream by doing. 
Dream your dreams but be their master. 
Men of worth have all had visions — 
Visions making hearts beat faster — 
Visions while they toiled and slaved 
Just to make those dreams come true. 
Come, my friend, let us be doing. 
Perhaps this fame will come to you. 

Wake up then! Rise up you sluggard. 
Great th'oughts ever go for naught 
Without some action; without doing 
Where is the success you sought? 
Rise up then, and let's be starting 
On life's long and uphill climb. 
Let us dream and still be ready 
For the mark we'll make on Time. 

Bernard Sampson, '40 

COMMENCEMENT 

The audience quieted as the graduates marched 
down the aisle and took their places. Each grad- 
uate was surveyed critically by anxious and beam- 
ing parents. The principal rose and started his 
introductory speech. The class sat up straighter 
and appeared to be listening intently. The affect 
was not marred if one overlooked the girls' jeal- 



24 



THE TATTLER 



ous glances at each others' gowns and the fact 
that the boys almost glowed because of their 
new outfits. 

In the midst of all this, in the very center of 
the platform, sat the class president. He was 
beginning to feel a trifle "scared". After all, 
there was his speech to think about, and quite 
a long one too, although the teachers all declared 
emphatically that it was just the right length. 
Thinking of the speech depressed him. Perhaps 
if he thought of something else — oh, yes! — his 
years in high school. Now that they were over, 
he had to admit they had been fun and worth 
while, too. The first two years had been spent 
with the other boys — not much studying, play- 
ing at sports, wasting time, assuming no respon- 
sibility. But then his father had died. It had 
been terrible; but everyone had to admit that it 
had done him good. He had been wild before 
then — wild, foolish, willful, and head-strong. The 
neighbors had marveled at the change in him 
after his father's death. The times had been hard 
at first; but soon he was used to them. Mom 
hadn't let him quit school. 

She declared that they could manage, and 
they had. How she had worked to raise her fam- 
ily right! The "kids" all helped, working when- 
ever they could. He worked Saturdays and after 
school. Much to the coach's disappointment, he 
gave up sports. That had been hard for him to 
do, loving them the way he did; and besides 
the coach said he was a good athlete. He had 
passed all his subjects easily. Mom would have 
been so upset if this had not been so. Well, try- 
ing hard did it. All the fellows liked him, even 
if he didn't have time for all the nonsense they 
enjoyed. Gosh, here he was, president of his 
class! It made him proud to think of it. Mom 
had been so happy when he told her. That had 
been a long time ago, though, because he had 
been president for the last two years. 

Golly, thinking of that speech again made 
his knees tremble when he looked at the audi- 
ence. That sea of faces seemed huge to him. He 
let his thoughts wander back to his home again. 
They had an awful time when all the "kids" 
caught the measles. Mom let him leave school 
for two weeks then and work, because nobody 
would send her washings. He looked down at 
his new suit. How Mom had scrimped so he 
could have new clothes for graduation. Mom 
said that he should be just as nicely dressed as 
anyone else, especially since he was delivering 
such a good speech. Everything was all right 
now, though. High school was over, and best 



of all, there was a job waiting. Yes, sir — a job! 
Good pay, too. Mom wouldn't have to work 
hard anymore. 

The principal was finished. His speech came 
next. The audience sat up. Here was something 
different; the principal's speech had begun to 
bore them. The class president smiled and 
stepped forward confidently. 

Arlene Sabo, '43 

WELCOME SPRING WITH A SONG 

When the winter is gone 

With its ice and snow, 
When the earth takes a yawn 

And things start to grow, 
When the birds have come back 

In their brightest array, 
And the bees keep on buzzing 

Day after day — 
After living through a winter so long 
It's time to welcome spring with a song! 

The apple-green leaves 

Against the pale blue sky 
Make the younger people gay; 

But the old people sigh, 
For the beauty of nature 

Is music to their ears; 
It strengthens their convictions 

And takes away their fears. 
Oh! After living through a winter so long 
We should all gladly welcome the spring with a 
song! 

You awake in the morning 

To the sounds of croaking frogs, 
Mingled with the barks and growls 

Of neighbors' carefree dogs. 
Your friends all greet you cheerfully 

As they go on their way 
To use their excess energy 

In working or in play. 
Oh! After bearing winter so long 
Be happy and welcome spring with a song! 

The tulips are blooming; 

The wild flowers debate 
"Will I blossom now, 

Or had I best wait?" 
Everyone's happy! 

Many wedding bells chime. 
The world's making progress, 

Now it's apple blossom time. 
Oh, it's time to be happy! Hit the top with a 

gong! 
For now we shall welcome spring with a song! 

Ruth Dodge, '40 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



25 



SMITH CHARITIES 

Northampton is the home of Jonathon Ed' 
wards, Carnegie People's Institute, Calvin Cool' 
idge, and Smith College — also Smith Charities. 
These charities were provided by Oliver Smith 
who was born in Hatfield on January 20, 1766. 
When he was but a year and a half old his father 
died. Later he received $500 as his share of his 
father's estate. Because he was shrewd, thrifty, 
and economical, he had acquired a good fortune 
before he was 30 years old. He was not very 
popular with his neighbors who called him an 
odd person. He was a Unitarian who sympa- 
thized with the middle class. Even though he 
had represented his town in the State Legisla- 
ture, he did not seek political office. 

Although his educational opportunities were 
limited, Oliver Smith was a very successful busi' 
ness man. He always preferred to make invest- 
ments at a small profit rather than to risk with 
the hope of obtaining large gains. As a result of 
his shrewdness, when he died on December 22, 
1845, he left an estate valued at almost $400,- 
000. 

His will provided funds to build an agricul- 
tural school and money to be given to girls, boys, 
and women under certain conditions. 

It was contested by the heirs-at-law that Theo- 
philus Phelps, one of the witnesses, was incom- 
petent because of insanity. With Daniel Webster 
defending the will, the case was brought up in 
the Supreme Judicial Court at Northampton in 
1847. It was one of the most outstanding con- 
troversies that had ever taken place in the Con- 
necticut Valley. The will was sustained by the 
decision. 

Oliver Smith's bequest of $30,000, providing 
for an agricultural school, was to be managed 
and improved by the trustees who were in charge 
of his will. Until sixty years from his death, 
the interest was to accumulate from this money, 
which would also be used for purchasing tracts 
of land for the school. 

Another part of Oliver Smith's will includes 
the sum of $360,000. This fund is known as 
Smith Charities. The beneficiaries of this fund 
must live in Northampton, Hadley, Hatfield, 
Amherst, Williamsburg, Deerfield, Greenfield, or 
Whately. A boy who joins this charity must be 
under eighteen years of age; he must be bound 
out in a good, respectable family: he must have 
a common school education and he must be in- 
structed in farming or some trade. After he has 
finished three years of work, at the age of twen- 



ty-one, he receives a loan of $500 which bears 
interest annually for five years. If his work has 
been well done and his conduct has pleased the 
trustees, he receives this money with compound 
interest. This benefit was intended, first, for in- 
digent boys, second, for boys having neither 
father nor mother, third, for boys having only 
one parent living, and last, for those having both 
their father and mother living. If the young 
man marries during the term of his apprentice- 
ship, he forfeits his claim to all of the pecuniary 
aid which is derived from these charities. In 
case of sickness he receives aid provided that 
such relief does not exceed the sum of $500 in 
addition to the compound interest. 

In order to join this charity a girl must be 
sixteen years of age. She must be bound out in 
a good, respectable fam ly and have a good, com- 
mon school education. Since she cannot be em- 
ployed in any kind of trade or in a shop or 
factory, the girl must learn the art of house- 
keeping, in which she will be bound out. At the 
age of eighteen her work will be finished. If 
she did her services well during her apprentice- 
ship, and if her character and conduct have satis- 
fied the trustees, at the time of her marriage 
she receives the sum of $300 and the interest 
which has grown from this sum, since her eight- 
eenth birthday. But if she marries before her 
eighteenth birthday she forfeits her claim to this 
sum of money. Any girl who has rendered her 
services successfully during her term, and is un- 
married, may receive the sum of $300 as a gift 
at the age of thirty years. In case of sickness the 
girl receives aid provided that such relief does 
not exceed the sum of $300 in addition to the 
compound interest. The indigent girls are first 
in order to receive this will, then the orphans 
with neither father nor mother, the orphans with 
only one parent living, and last, those having 
both parents living. 

An indigent young woman who is about to 
marry is granted a marriage gift of $50 provided 
that the man whom she is about to marry has a 
good moral character and industrious habits. An 
indigent young woman who applies for this gift 
must be between the ages of eighteen and forty- 
five years of age, and must have the ability to 
read and write as the least educational qualifi- 
cation. Also, to be eligible she must sustain a 
good moral character, and must be a registered 
voter in one of the eight towns mentioned, if 
her parents do not reside in one of these eight 
towns. 

Any widow whose children are not above 



26 



THE TATTLER 



eighteen years of age, receives a sum of $50 
every year provided that she sustains a good 
moral character and industrious habits. If she 
is not a registered voter in one of the towns be 
fore mentioned, she must have resided in one of 
these towns for at least a year and a half before 
her application is made out. The widow's child- 
ren also may be legally adopted. But after her 
youngest child has reached the age of eighteen 
years, she receives the money no longer. 

Oliver Smith, greater in death than in life, 
was never very popular with his neighbors or 
friends, but he has done much for them. The 
Smith Agricultural School and also the Smith 
Charities which we have today, are very bene- 
ficial to us. 

Josephine Cerpovicz, '41 



SMILES 

Laughing maidens, what a treasure, 
Like a cup brim full of pleasure, 
Like a cooling spring that bubbles, 
With its music drowning troubles. 

Smiles can make a pathway brighter 
And the wheels of life run lighter; 
Even sneered-at country grinning 
Makes a maid look bright and winning. 



THE FROGS IN THE SPRING 

Across the road from my house, 
In a little dingle dell, 
The Froggies stay awake at night, 
Their stories sweet to tell. 

Johnny peeped to Janie, 
"See that full moon up above? 
And I ask you very sweetly, 
Will you be my lady-love?" 

Janie said to Johnny, 
In her own sweet froggy way, 
"Won't you sit and peep for me 
Until the break of day?" 

So Johnny sat and peeped his love, 
Until the sky grew light, 
And Janie gave her answer. 
"We'll be wed tomorrow night." 

I'm sure they're very happy, 
For we hear them peep and woo 
From nearly dusk to early morn 
As all true sweethearts do. 

Frostine Graves, '43 



Oft I've seen in many places 
Lovely smiles on homely faces. 
Maid, if you will be beguiling 
Never cease to greet all smiling! 

Jean Everett, '40 



ON BEING SCARED AT NIGHT 

Don't think I'm scared, oh no — not me! 
For I'm as brave as brave can be, 
But when it comes to going to bed 
I like to crawl right in with dad. 



SPRINGTIME 

It is springtime in the country, 
And the trees are sprouting leaves; 
The air is full of music 
Of the birds and honey bees. 

It's the time we've been awaiting 
Since the winter snows set in; 
Soon the air and sun will warm us 
And the summer sports begin. 



Sometimes I see things big and tall; 
Sometimes they're not there at all; 
Sometimes they're happy, but when they're sad 
1 just crawl right in with dad. 



First it's fishing — gaily fishing 
For that first big rainbow trout 
Then it's baseball, good old baseball 
Till the umpire shouts, "You're out.' 



Sometimes they're witches, goblins too: 
And sometimes they look right at you. 
When they look angry and get too mad 
I just crawl in bed with dad. 

Betty Damon, '43 



It's springtime, yes, it"> --pnngtime 
In this good old land of our--. 
When the air is full of music 
And the woods are full of flowers. 



George V. Warner Jr., '39 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



27 




Seated — Florence Packard, Jean Everett, Ruth Dodge, Ashton Rustcmeyer, Doris Williams, Mary 

Daniels, Richard Culver, Lida Miner. 
Standing — Marion Sabo, Faith Dresser, Rita Kulash, Russell Bisbee, June Bowker, Josephine 

Cerpovicz, Velma Brown. 



The Pro Merito Society is made up of fifteen 
members; seven are seniors and eight are juniors. 
In the fall the following officers were elected 
from each group: 
Seniors: 

President — Velma Brown 
vice-president — Florence Packard 
Secretary-Treasurer — Ashton Rustemeyer 
Juniors: 

President — Russell Bisbee 

Vice-president — Lida Miner 
Secretary-Treasurer — June Bowker 
On October 14, 1939, the annual Fall Con- 
vention of the Western Massachusetts Pro Meri- 
to Societies was held in Easthampton. 

After the junior and senior business meetings 
dinner was served in the Congregational Church. 
After dinner the program presented in the new 
auditorium of the high school included talks by 
Raymond H. MacNulty, adviser of the West- 
field chapter, and Charles G. Tucker, adviser of 



the Lee chapter. Winthrop S. Welles, head of 
the department of education at Massachusetts 
State College gave the main address. There was 
also music by the Easthampton High School 
band and orchestra. In the afternoon the con- 
vention delegates were guests of Williston 
Academy at the Williston-Suffield football game 
on Sawyer Field. 

The annual Spring Convention was held at 
Greenfield High School on May 11, 1940. Five 
members of our society attended. Three hun- 
dred delegates from 22 schools were present. In 
the morning there was the usual business meeting 
after which luncheon was served. The speaking 
program after lunch included addresses by Ed- 
gar Burr Smith, principal of Greenfield High 
School and H. Russell Mack, state superinten- 
dent of secondary education, who took as his 
subject, "Youth and Education." The conven- 
tion concluded with a baseball game between 
Greenfield and the Massachusetts State freshmen. 



28 



THE TATTLER 




Tattler Staff 



Seated — Velma Brown, Ashton Rustemeyer, Miss Mary T. Walsh, Jean Everett, Bernard Murphy, 

Shirley Rhoades. 
Standing — William Ryan, Bernard Sampson, Franklin Bartlett, Russell Bisbee, Francis Molloy, 

Raymond Johndrow. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



29 




Standing — Anne Lloyd, Velma Brown, Robert Newell, Marion Sabo, Shirley Rhoades, Jean 
Everett. 

Seated — Faith Dresser, Russell Bisbee, Mrs. R. A. Warner, Miss Mary T. Walsh, Lucius Merritt, 
Lida Miner. 



The members of the Forensic Club met June 
7th, 1939 and elected Jeanne Everett, president, 
Velma Brown, Vice-president, Marion Sabo, sec 
retary, and Russell Bisbee, treasurer. It was 
voted to hold food sales in Chesterfield, Goshen 
and Williamsburg. The Haydenville group chose 
to run a card party. These undertakings proved 
very successful. 

Williamsburg High School entered the pre 
state tournament held at Hadley, February 29th. 
Two of the contestants, Marion Sabo and Lucius 
Merritt, both in the humorous division, placed 
in the finals. 



On March 29th Mrs. Warner, Mr. and Mrs. 
Merritt, Robert Otis and ten speakers drove to 
Concord. While touring this historical section 
they saw "The Old North Bridge", and Emer- 
son's, Thoreau's, Hawthorne's, and Alcott's 
homes. The afternoon was filled with work for 
all — speaking for the ten contestants and judg- 
ing for the rest of the group. Although the Wil- 
liamsburg contestants did not place, it was good 
experience and great fun. Saturday evening a 
banquet and a ball were enjoyed by all. The 
group returned home Sunday. 



30 



THE TATTLER 




Standing — Edward Golash, Edward Ames, Michael Batura, Leo Dymerski, Robert McAllister. 
Kneeling — Harry Warner, Donald Howe, Co-Captain Bernard Murphy, Co-Captain William 
Ryan, Francis Molloy. 

Boys' Basketball Team 



Williamsburg High turned out one of the best 
basketball teams it has ever had. Although 
Burgy played many schools out of its class the 
Green Wave won 9 games and lost 7. Coach 
Philip Melody had three vets, Bernard Murphy, 
Bill Ryan, and Ted Ames to work with, and with 
many new-comers he moulded t gether a team 
which came in second in Franklin League com- 
petition. This year the basketball team won a 
new record for Williamsburg High School. It 
defeated Clarke School for the first time in the 
history of sports at Burgy. Many of the games 
that Burgy lost were lost by very small margins; 
the Franklin League championship was lost by 
one point. The light lor this championship was 
a bitter struggle among Clarke School, Charlc- 
mont and Williamsburg. The outcome of the 
struggle saw Clarke School in first place, Burgy 
in second, and Charlemont in third. Burgy's 
loss was undoubtedly due to the lack of reserve 
material. The team, as it did in 1939, received 
an invitation to play in the M.S.C. tournament. 



Burgy won over Petersham in this tournament. 
Each player participating received a medal. Bill 
Ryan and Bernard Murphy are graduating in 
June, but Coach Melody hopes to produce an- 
other fine basketball team again next year. 
Summary of Games 



Willi 


Willi- 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Willi 


Will. 


Willi 


Willi. 


Willi 



amsburg 


38 


Belchertown 


31 


amsburg 


15 


Arms 


28 


amsburg 


35 


Alumni 


37 


amsburg 


28 


Powers 


12 


amsburg 


25 


St. Joseph's 


49 


amsburg 


14 


Clarke School 


30 


amsburg 


39 


Sanderson 


28 


amsburg 


35 


Clarke School 


30 


amsburg 


27 


Charlemont 


20 


amsburg 


43 


Powers 


28 


amsburg 


30 


Charlemont 


31 


amsburg 


31 


Belchertown 


32 


amsburg 


30 


Huntington 


39 


amsburg 


27 


Sanderson 


21 


amsburg 


24 


Huntington 


41 


amsburg 


24 


Petersham 


14 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



31 




Seated- -Cecelia Soltys, Doris Dymerski, Myla Campbell, Captain Shirley Rhoades, Mary Bowker, 

Rita Kulash, June Bowker. 
Standing — Cheerleader Florence Packard, Irene MeU, June Colburn, Logia Jablonski, Bernice 

Golash, Bette Tetro, Cheerleader Thelma Packard. 

Girls' Basketball Teann 



This year our girls' basketball team broke even 
by winning half and losing half of their games. 
The girls were more enthusiastic this year and 
fought hard to the finish, trying their very best. 

At the beginning of the season a meeting was 
held and the following officers were chosen to 
lead them through the season: Co-captains, 
Shirley Rhoades, Logia Jablonski; and Manager, 
Charlotte Otis. At this time it was voted to 
purchase new uniforms. The girls bought very 
attractive suits, and the team made a good ap- 
pearance on the floor. 

Their first game was with the Arms Academy 
girls, and they lost this game, but the girls 
showed "fighting spirit" and promised a good 
season on the floor. In their next appearance 
they met a strong Alumni team and were nosed 
out by two points; but they played better than 
before and their hopes were still high. They 
then met the Hamp "Y" girls and beat them 
by one point in a low scoring game. They also 
beat them in a return game. With these two 
victories they went into the Franklin League 



with spirits aroused, and they came out well by 
winning three and losing three. They defeated 
Sanderson Academy twice and Charlemont once; 
but they fell to Powers twice and Charlemont 
once. 

This year the team will lose Shirley Rhoades 
and Logia Jablonski, Co-captains, Myla Camp- 
bell and Bette Tetro through graduation. But 
with June Bowker and Rita Kulash, the main- 
stays, as well as many other future stars, next 
year's team may be labeled a success. 

Summary of Games 



Williamsburg 


14 


Arms Academy 


31 


Williamsburg 


22 


Alumni 


20 


Williamsburg 


13 


Hamp "Y" 


12 


Williamsburg 


25 


Hamp "Y" 


22 


Williamsburg 


17 


Powers 


30 


Williamsburg 


49 


Sanderson 


28 


Williamsburg 


20 


Charlemont 


26 


Williamsburg 


24 


Powers 


31 


Williamsburg 


22 


Charlemont 


14 


Williamsburg 


19 


Sanderson 


1 



32 



THE TATTLER 




Seated — Leo Dymerski, Robert Kearney, Jerry Larkin, Robert McAllister, Raymond Johndrow, 

Bernard Murphy, Harry Warner, William Ryan. 
Standing — Manager Frank Soltys, Edward Ames, Francis Molloy, Ralph Bates, Edward Golash, 

Coach Philip Melody. 



Fifteen candidates reported to Coach Melody 
for the initial practice. Out of this number six 
are veterans. The other three positions arc wide 
open but should be capably filled by the new- 
comers. The boys had only one week of practice 
before they won the first game over Clarke 
School 8 to 3. This year only eleven games are 
scheduled due to the lateness in getting started. 
The schedule includes games with Smith School, 
Smith Academy, Sanderson Academy, Easthamp- 



ton, Clarke School and Belchertown. Four play 
ers will be lost through graduation. They are 
Ray Johndrow, who has done an excellent job 
of catching for the past three years, Bernard 

Murphy and Bill Ryan who have turned in some 
fine pitching, and Frisco Molloy who has held 
down his position in fine style for several sea- 
sons. High hopes are held for a very successful 
season. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



33 




Seated — Charles Eddy, Francis O'Brien, Bernard Murphy, Raymond Johndrow, William Ryan, 

Ralph Bates. 
Second row — Coach Philip Melody, Harry Warner, George Molloy, Edward Ames, Robert 

McAllister, David West, Edward Golash. 
Third row — Jerry Larkin, Michael Batura, Lucius Merritt, Francis Molloy, Leo Dymerski. 



Soccer 



This year marked the introduction of a new 
sport at Williamsburg High. Burgy entered the 
Hampshire Soccer League which included teams 
from Holyoke High, Hopkins, Smith Acade- 
my, Smith School, Holyoke Vocational and 
Easthampton. The call for candidates was an- 
swered by 25 boys. Most of these knew noth' 



ing at all about the new game, but they were 
eager to learn. They didn't win very many 
games but they did learn the finer points of the 
game and with most of the boys coming back 
next year Burgy hopes to have a stronger team 
than it had this year. 



34 



THE TATTLER 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President — Allen Bisbee 
Vice-President — Chester King 
Secretary — Thomas Barrus 
Treasurer — Marjorie Damon 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



George Judd 
Mari Wells 
Barry Gray 
Robert Mathers 
Mrs. Hubert Smith 



Louise Mosher 

Miss Anne Dunphy 

Mrs. R. A. Warner 

Edward Foster 

Philip Melody 



Mary T. Walsh 

BIRTHS 

Daughter to Pauline Packard Atherton '36. 
Son to Roger Warner "31. 
Daughter to Austin Snow '31. 
Daughter to Helen Nash Watling '32. 

MARRIAGES 

Helen Childs '39 to Frank Cicconi. 
Doris Newell '39 to William Webb. 
Hazel Packard '39 to Frank Taylor. 
Hazel Torrey '39 to Bernard McAvoy. 
Edward Foster '25 to Edith Derosia. 
Phyllis Baker '31 to John Deming. 

COLLEGE GRADUATES 

Gertrude King '34 — Bridgewater State Teach- 
ers' College. 

Sheila Swenson '36 — Smith College. 

Robert Bisbee '37 — Parks Air College. 

Evelyn Rustemeyer '35 — North Adams State 
Teachers' College. 

Eleanor Wheeler '35 — North Adams State 
Teachers' College. 

DEATHS 
Bernice Bickford Hathaway '36. 



CLASS OF 1939 

Dorothy Algustoski — Home. 

Richard Bates — Home. 

Helen Batura — Home. 

Jane Bickford — Smith School. 

Jean Carney — Working in Longmeadow. 

Helen Childs — Mrs. Frank Ciccone. 

Barbara Edwards — Working in Haydenville. 

Ruth Evans — Northampton Commercial Col- 
lege. 

Carlton Field — Smith School. 

Stacia Golash — Working in Williamsburg. 

Warren Gould — Working as printer's ap- 
prentice. 

Rita LaFlamme — Working at Hampshire 
County Sanatorium. 

Barbara Lloyd — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Frances Metz — Secretary in Hartford. 

Doris Newell, Simsbury — Mrs. William Webb. 

Norma Nietsche — Working at Williamsburg 
High School. 

Donald Otis — Home. 

Edith Packard — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Hazel Packard, Williamsburg — Mrs. Frank 
Taylor. 

Betty Penn — Home. 

Doris Sabo — Smith School. 

Virginia Shumway — Secretary at Shumway ^ 
Riley Plumbing Company. 

Francis Soltys — Post Graduate at Williams- 
Burg High School. 

James Stone — Home. 

Raymond Stone — Smith School. 

Hazel Torrey — Mrs. Bernard McAvoy. 

George Warner — Post Graduate at Williams- 
burg High School. 

Janice Wells — Noith.impton Commercial Col- 
lege. 

Phyllis West — Smith School. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



35 



AMERICAN YOUTH OF TODAY 

(Continued from Page 22) 
no time is given to physical instruction. In some 
of the latter cases it is almost impossible to in- 
elude this kind of education in the school pre 
gram, but in most cases it could and should be 
done. 

Many people think that to devote a certain 
part of each school day to physical instruction 
would only result in giving less time to mental 
and moral instruction. This, however, is not the 
case. Physical instruction would improve the 
mind in that it teaches one to think and act 
quickly by co-ordinating mind and muscle. It 
also improves the moral standard of the youth. 
If a person uses his spare time in building up 
his body, he has less time to get into trouble. 
If necessary, the school day could be lengthened 
by an hour or so in order that the time spent 
on physical education would not take time away 
from the regular school program. 

Let us hope that in the near future, a period 
for physical instruction will be included in all 
school programs so the American youth of today 
and tomorrow will be better fit both physically 
and mentally for the future. Francis Molloy '40 



CLASSMATES 

Tune: "Playmates" 

Oh, we are classmates; 
We come from Burgy High; 
We study and we play 
Through all the livelong day. 
Now we must leave school, 
And it is sad to go; 
Though happy memories 
Will last we know. 



Now our four years are through; 
We wish to bid adieu, 
With thanks to all our teachers 
And to all the friends we knew. 

Oh, we are classmates; 
We're leaving Burgy High; 
We know our chemistry 
And physiology. 
We know our Latin 
And all our English, too, 
And these will be of help 
In what we do. 

Words by Marian Sabo '40 



Compliments of 


Compliments 


F. N. Graves & Son 


of 




A FRIEND 


WILLIAMSBURG 








\\ 



Compliments of 



WM. J. SHEEHAN 
& COMPANY 

HAYDENVILLE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Packard's Soda Shoppe 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL 

School Supplies, Magazines, Greeting Cards 

FILMS AND DEVELOPING 

Hoods Ice Cream McKesson Products 

FOUNTAIN & BOOTH SERVICE 


Athletic Supplies 

for every sport 

T. A. PURSEGLOVE 

15 State St. Northampton 


Trunks Bags 
and Small Leather Goods 

HARLOW LUGGAGE STORE 

28 Center Street Northampton 
Zippers Repaired and Replaced 


Compliments of 

J. STEWART MOLLISON 

DAILY EXPRESS 
NORTHAMPTON TO PLAINFIELD 


Best Wishes 

to the 

Class oi 1940 

Cohen Bros. 

Northampton 


George A. Munson 

TRUCKING 
MARKET GARDEN 

TEL. 34-2 CHESTERFIELD 



NUTTING'S OIL SERVICE 

Texaco Gasoline 
Range Oil Motor Oil 

TEL. 1816-M NORTHAMPTON 

TEL. 1816-1 FLORENCE 



Where Do You Want to Be a Year From Now? 

This book will help you to decide 

• What Do You Want To Be? $2.00 

By George H. Waltz, Jr. 
A career book for boys 

Includes: Choosing a Career; Aviation; Medicine; Engineering; Crime Detection; Radio; 
Television; Journalism; Photography; Commercial Art; Exploring; Farming; Forestry; Teaching; 
Coaching; Government; Business; Manufacturing; Banking. 

HAMPSHIRE BOOKSHOP, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



C. A. SHARPE, Inc. 

16 Crafts Ave. 
Northampton, Mass. 

Maytag Washers and Ironers 
Hart Oil Burners 

Radios — Expert Service 



Compliments of 

G. H. Stanton 

General Merchandise 

West Chesterfield, Mass. 



Tel. 8006 



Sbaltan 



FURNITURE COMPANY 

QUALITY FURNITURE— MODERATELY PRICED 
Telephone 2514- W 18-20 Center Street Northampton, Massachusetts 



Northampton Commercial College 

"The School of Thoroughness" 
Northampton, Massachusetts 

JOHN C. PICKETT, Principal 

45th YEAR 45th YEAR 


When in need of 

Clothing, Furnishings/ Shoes 

for Men and Boys 
TRY 

THE FLORENCE STORE 

90 Maple St. Florence 

Telephone 828-W J. A. Longtin 
Service — Quality — Satisfaction 


Jones The Florist 

Bulbs Perennials 
Cut Flowers Floral Designs 

Tel. 4331 Haydenville 


YOU NEED OUR EXPERT 

DRY CLEANING 

FOR BEAUTY AND COMFORT 

Will call for <& deliver 

Telephone 2655 

haddocks 

Cleaners * Tailors * Furriers 

Florence, Mass. 


I. LEVIN TAILORING CO. 

First Class Tailors 

& Cleaners 

Tuxedo Suits to rent 

7 Pleasant St. Northampton 
Tel. 1061-W 


Compliments of 

A 

Friend 



WILUAMSBURG GARAGE 

C. K. HATHAWAY 
Tel. 4351 



Service Station 

Battery Service 

Ice Cream. Candy, Cigars 

WILLIAMSBURG. MASS. 



Compliments of 

Herlihy's 

Dry Goods Store 



76 Maple St. 



Florence, Mass. 



Compliments of 

THE CLARY FARM 

SILAS SNOW 
Try Our Maple Syrup 

Telephone 3563 

WILLIAMSBURG 


Village Hill Nursery 

ALPINES. PERENNIALS 

and 

ANNUAL PLANTS 

WILLIAMSBURG 



Hillcrest Farm 


Compliments of 


Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 




SINGLE COMB 


FIRST NATIONAL 


RHODE ISLAND REDS 


STORES 


Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 




WILLIAMSBURG. MASS. 


WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 



CHAS. A. BOWKER 



Hardware, Paint and General Merchandise 

TELEPHONE 245 WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 


Compliments oi 


Woodworth Beauty Salon 

O. J. Bonneau, Prop. 


M. M. Dunphy 

D.D.S. 


200 Main St. 




Phone 2390 Northampton, Mass. 


Northampton, Mass. 



Breguet's 

SERVICE STATION 

Mobilgas Mobiloil 

Mobilubrication 

Florence, Mass. 



Hardware, Sporting Goods 

Fishing Tackle, Baseball, Tennis 

... and Camping Items ... 

Foster-Farrar Co. 

162 Main St. 



Northampton. 



Mass. 



Refrigerators 



Radios 



Washers 




aESffiiis 



ELECTRIC SHOP 



Snyder's Express 



22 years of 



Friendly Service 



Automatic Oil Heat 



Wiring 



Radio Repairs 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

National Shoe Repairing 

John Mateja, Prop. 
15 Masonic Street 



Tel. 826-W 



Northampton, Mass. 






Remember the Excitement in Your Neighborhood When the Last House Burned? 

Then the Sad News, "NO INSURANCE". Never Let that Happen at 

YOUR HOUSE. We Will Protect you the MOMENT YOU 

'PHONE US. Do it NOW. 



FRANKLIN KING, Jr. 

INSURANCE 



277 Main Street 



Phone 610 



Northampton. Mass. 



NEWELL FUNERAL HOME 



R. D. NEWELL 



74 KING STREET 



NORTHAMPTON 



C. F. JENKINS 



Stationery 



Greeting Cards 
Ice Cream 



Medicines 



WILLIAMSBURG 



CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. Leroy Chilson 

AWNINGS 
FURNITURE COVERINGS & UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 



Furniture Upholstering 

Harness Shop 

Slip Covers. Cushions 



Automobile Plate and Safety Glass 

Auto Tops and Upholstery 

Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 



34 CENTER STREET. NORTHAMPTON 





Emerick's 


COMPLIMENTS 


Repair Shop 


OF 


All Makes of Cars 




HAYDENVILLE 




PIZZITOLA MUSIC 


A Friend 


STUDIO 




"The School of Achievement" 




Banjo, Mandolin, Guitar and 
kindred instruments 




TEL. 2650 
142 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON 



WILLIAM E. DEVLIN 



Meats, Groceries, and 



General Merchandise 



Phone 3551 



Haydenville 



Charles W. Wells 

R.C.A. RADIO 

KELVINATOR REFRIGERATORS 

ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 



Tel. 3921 



Haydenville 



Compliments 
of 



A FRIEND 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



MacLEOD TREE CARE 



Telephone 3451 



Williamsburg 



J. W. PARSONS & SON 



Tractors and Farm Machinery 



131 Bridge Street 



Tel. 2885 



Northampton 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

JAMES R. MANSFIELD 
& SON 

Funeral Home 

HAYDENVILLE 



Good Things to Eat 

BECKMANN'S 

Northampton 
Candy Mailed Tasty Pastries 

Refreshing Sodas Fine Ice Cream 



HENRY A. BIDWELL 
BIDWELL TRAVEL SERVICE 

INSURANCE OF EVERY FORM 

TOURS BY AIR — RAIL — BUS 

TRIPS TO WORLDS FAIR 



78 Main St. 



Tel. 351 



Northampton 



Compliments of 

JOHN H. GRAHAM, Estate 

COAL OIL ICE 

Williamsburg 



HOTEL NORTHAMPTON 

AND 

WIGGIN'S OLD TAVERN 

An Inn of Colonial Charm 

Excellent Food Popular Prices 

Let us serve your Wedding Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners 
FIREPROOF ROOMS $2.00 UP 

Lewis Wiggins, Landlord 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. F. BURKE 



WILLIAMSBURG 



K^somplirnenls oj 



Tk, 

riayaenville o 



avmg 



s Dank 



Modern Education 



201 Main Street 



Our modern school systems put a lot oi work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects 
in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. A lit'le fore- 
sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will help 
them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 



O. T. DEWHURST 

OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS 
Tel. 184-W 



Northampton 



McCallum's 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

NORTHAMPTON 

To the graduates of the Williamsburg High School — 

Our congratulations and we hope that your future 

will be crowned with success. 



Smart Wearing Apparel ior Young Men 

AT MODERATE PRICES 

Harry Daniel Associates 

Northampton, Mass. 



Winthrop Foster 

NORTHAMPTON'S CAMERA SHOP 

"We have the film — 
we load your Camera" 

Phone 1040 Draper Hotel Bldg. 



PAINTS 

& 

WALL PAPER 

Pierce's Paint Store 



Tel. 1207 



196 Main St. 



Compliments 

Noble & Flynn 

REGISTERED 
PHARMACISTS 

ICE CREAM SODAS COLLEGE ICES 



24 Main St. 



Northampton 



YOU may always depend 
upon the quality of flowers 
which come from 




INC. 

FLOWERS 



WILLIAM BAKER & SON 


Good Shoes 


General Merchandise 


Correctly Fitted 


Courtesy Service 


Reasonably Priced 


Satisfaction 


DAVID BOOT SHOP 


CHESTERFIELD. MASS. 


221 Main St. 


PITTSBURGH PAINTS 


Northampton, Mass. 



The E & J Cigar Co. 

Wholesale Tobacconists 

23 MAIN ST. 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Compliments of 

Packard Bros. 

WILLIAMSBURG. 
MASS. 



Lumber 



Maple Products 



HILL BROS 

Silk Hosiery 
Socks 



Pajamas 



Main St. 



Northampton 



Watches — Jewelery 

and 

Repairing 

AT 

Dearing's 



116 Main St. 



Northampton, 



Mass. 



For the young man who grad- 
uates this year we have every- 
thing that he will need for this 
important occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 



Ed's Lunch 



Florence, 



Mass. 



ELY FUNERAL HOME 

CHARLES E. ELY 
Lady Assistant 



Tel. 1292-W 



Northampton 



Compliments of 



TWIN 



CLEANING, DYEING & STORAGE 



North Street 



Northampton 



E. J. Gare & Son 

Jewelers 

CLUB PINS 

CLASS RINGS 
TROPHIES 



112 Main St. 



Northampton 



TODD'S 

NORTHAMPTON 

To the Graduates of the 
Class of 1940 

Congratulations and Success 



Compliments of 



Ed Sheehan 



24 Pleasant St. 



Northampton 



Compliments of 

SHUMWAY & RILEY, INC. 

Plumbing 6c Heating 

Distributor of Pioneer Oil Burners 
Center St. Northampton 



Compliments 




of 


Compliments of 


E. J. Gusetti 


A Friend 


HAYDENVILLE 




A. Soltys 


Socony Service 


MEATS GROCERIES 


Station 


VEGETABLES 


DIAL 275 


Telephone 223 Haydenville 


WILLIAMSBURG 


Beebe's Lunch 


Compliments of 


A good place to eat 


C. O. CARLSON 


TOASTED SANDWICHES 


GOSHEN 


Berkshire Trail A. L. Beebe, Prop. 




HAYDENVILLE 






Compliments of 


GAGNON & FORSANDER 


Hampden Bottling Co. 


47 Cottage St. Depot Avenue 


if* 


Easthampton Florence 


jj^kik 


Tel. 660 Tel. 819 


T GINGER J 




\^y | 







ALLISON SPENCE 

100 Main St., Northampton 

Photographer to Williamsburg High School 
Since 1917 with two exceptions 



'THANKS BURGY" 



CHARLES A. BISBEE HOMER R. BISBEE 

Tel. Chesterfield 4-2 Tel. Chesterfield 4-3 

BISBEE BROTHERS 

Dealers in all kinds of 

Grain, Feed, Fertilizers, Salt, Cement, and Agricultural Tools 

Bird & Sons Roofing Paper Engines and Separators 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvesting Machinery 

Building Material Oliver Plows and Cultivators High Grade Grass Seed 

Norfolk Paint 

Get our prices on anything you need 
before ordering elsewhere 

STOREHOUSES AT WILLIAMSBURG AND CHESTERFIELD 

Telephone Williamsburg 271 Williamsburg, Mass., R. F. D. 1